FAQs about the Coronavirus

Corona FAQs

Q: What is SHVV doing to make their hospital as safe as possible for me and my pet?

A: We are monitoring AVA, NSW Government & WHO guidelines & updating our practice protocols constantly. We are asking clients who are unwell to stay at home, keeping employees home if they are unwell, cleaning surfaces within the clinic & maintaining distance as much as possible. Please help us by following our requests to stand back from reception, use hand-sanitisers etc.

Q: What can I do to help keep SHVV a safe place?

A: We need to minimise contact time between people so please

  • Limit the number of people presenting your pet to just one owner if possible
  • When arriving for your appointment, please wait in your car
  • Please phone us from your car on arrival and we can return the phone call to welcome you into the clinic when we are ready to see your pet.
  • Please use hand sanitisers located in the clinic.
  • Please phone ahead to order required prescription medicine repeats or food, worming and flea control in advance so we can arrange to have them ready for you without the need to wait.

Q: My pet needs to be seen by a Vet but I’m in self-isolation (maybe I have tested positive to COVID-19). What can I do?

A: Call us! We will discuss options – rest assured we will find a way to care for your pet. Please do not break quarantine and put other people at risk.

Q: I need to come to the Vet hospital but I don’t want to (because I’m elderly or immunocompromised). What can I do?

A: Call us! We will discuss options – rest assured we will find a way to care for your pet. Options include dropping-off medications, house-calls or collecting your pet to be examined at the hospital.

Q: How does COVID-19 spread?

A: The World Health Organisation states: People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. This is why it is important to stay more than 1 meter (3 feet) away from a person who is sick.

Q: Can I catch Covid-19 from my pet?

A: The World Health Organisation states: While there has been one instance of a dog being infected in Hong Kong, to date, there is no evidence that a dog, cat or any pet can transmit COVID-19. COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly.

Q: Can humans catch COVID-19 from animals?

A: The World Health Organisation states: Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in animals. Occasionally, people get infected with these viruses which may then spread to other people. For example, SARS-CoV was associated with civet cats and MERS-CoV is transmitted by dromedary camels. Possible animal sources of COVID-19 have not yet been confirmed.

To protect yourself, such as when visiting live animal markets, avoid direct contact with animals and surfaces in contact with animals. Ensure good food safety practices at all times. Handle raw meat, milk or animal organs with care to avoid contamination of uncooked foods and avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Useful links:

Coronavirus: Information for looking after your pets

Update on taking care of your pets during the coronavirus epidemic

We know this is an anxious time for everyone and you may be concerned how best to look after your pet in this current situation.

Until advised otherwise, we are open as normal – here are some guidelines to help both humans and animals stay safe and healthy.

If your pet needs veterinary attention and:

  • You have been overseas within the last 14days
  • You’re experiencing symptoms
  • Need to self-isolate

Please phone us for advice and we will make a plan together with you.

In line with social distancing recommendations, we are keeping waiting times to a minimum.

We ask you to:

  • Limit the number of people presenting your pet to just one owner if possible
  • When arriving for your appointment, don’t come straight in, take a look through the window and if there is no clear space to sit away from other people, stay outside if possible
  • Please phone us if you are waiting outside or in your car, and we can return the phone call to let you know when the waiting room is fairly empty or to welcome you into the clinic when we are ready to see your pet.

Please use hand sanitisers located in the clinic.

Please phone ahead to order required prescription medicine repeats or food, worming and flea control in advance so we can arrange to have them ready for you without the need to wait.

Call or email us with questions and check our web site for updates.

We are working hard to ensure we can continue to provide complete veterinary care.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. This situation is rapidly evolving, and we will provide updates as required.

Note that this is a rapidly evolving situation and advice provided here is reflective of the evidence at hand. For up to date information on the COVID-19 situation in Australia go to health.gov.au

 

Information about the dog in Hong Kong who tested positive:

Payment Options: ZipMoney and ZipPay

It can be very distressing not being able to afford vet treatment for your pet. The last thing we want is for you to compromise your pet’s health and happiness due to financial constraints.

As such, we are always looking for reliable financial options for our clients. At the moment we have been using ZipPay/ZipMoney and so far the feedback has been positive.

What is ZipPay?

Zippay covers bills under $1000.00. Repayments are made directly to ZipPay $40 a month with zero interest.

What is ZipMoney?

ZipMoney covers bills over $1000.00. Repayments vary depending on credit rating and total amount borrowed, this is determined by ZipMoney. There is zero interest for the first three months of repayments.

Am I Eligible?

Eligibility for either financing option is decided by the company and is dependent on credit history. It is always worth applying first, if an application is unsuccessful you will be notified of such.

Where can I find more information?

For more information on how either financing option works you can visit this link. If you would like to use either option for your pet’s vet treatment you can speak to one of our team members, preferably in person as they will be better able to answer any of your questions and help get you started!

If you have already received a treatment plan from one of our vets with a price range included, you can sign up for ZipMoney/ZipPay yourself via this website. Once you have submitted a request via ZipPay/ZipMoney, please contact us so we can keep track of your application and subsequently book your pet in for their procedure.

 

 

Puppy’s First Vet Visit

Congratulations on your new family member! A new puppy is always an exciting time for the entire family.

Who can resist the wagging tail, puppy kisses and all too big paws of a growing pup

Whether you are a veteran puppy parent or not, it is always a good idea to bring your new little friend for a vet check – even if they are completely healthy and up to date with vaccinations.

The reason that we encourage a first vet check for your puppy is so that we can check for any health conditions that are not always obvious (for example heart murmurs or funny knees).

Another good reason for a first puppy check is that you can ask our vets any questions you have concerning your puppies health, training and future plans (this can range from discussions about diet, pet insurance, vaccination frequency, appropriate parasite prevention, dental health, toilet training and etc.)

We have complementary puppy packs for your pups first visit which gives you all the information you need to give your little friend the best start in life, you can access one of the puppy care plans here.

Make looking after your new puppy easier with our Pet Wellness Plans!

Lastly, we have Pet Wellness Plans that allow you spread the costs of your new puppies health needs as well saving you time and money.

These plans mean you never have to pay for your puppies vaccinations up front and also mean all their necessary parasite protection is delivered automatically to your front door whenever they are due.

We also include 20% off your puppies’ desexing, free microchipping and four free standard vet consults on these plans!

Read more about our Wellness Plans or Sign up directly here. 

What to expect for your puppies’ first vet visit and vaccination

 

Tick Season

We had our first paralysis tick patient last week. A little poodle had just returned from a trip to the bush when his owner noticed a paralysis tick on his ear!

 

Ticks aren’t always immediately visibly, they can be in hidden places such as in between your pet’s toes.

His owner was vigilant and kept up to date with his flea and worming treatment however not all flea products protect against ticks.  Luckily his mum did the right thing and brought him to us straight away with the tick she managed to pull off for identification.

 

We have also had a couple of clients report to us that they have seen ticks around their yards! Warmer weather is definitely tick season and if you plan on going to any bush area with your four-legged friend it is important to confirm that the parasite protection you are using includes ticks.

Cats are also susceptible to ticks so be cautious if your feline goes outdoors or in particular has access to overgrown, leafy areas.

 

We stock a couple of products that protect cats and dogs against ticks so if you have any doubts feel free to drop by our clinic or call us for a chat.

If you would like more information on ticks, what symptoms to look out for in particular and what to do you can read on here

New Anaesthetic Machine!

We can now keep our small patients warmer (& safer) than ever during their anaesthetics.

Meet our new anaesthetic machine: not just a pointless bit of technology!

A) This is a special low resistance carbon dioxide scrubber, this allows us to run a re-breathing circuit for animals down to 2 kg (previously 10 kg was the lowest we could go). B) This is the attached heating circuit.

When our patients are under anaesthetic it’s very important to stop them getting cold which can slow their recovery and healing but the smaller they are the harder it is to avoid them getting cold.  Now not only are they lying on a hot water bed, our new anaesthetic machine helps keep them warm.

On a non re-breathing system a patient is getting a constant flow of fresh, COLD oxygen to breath. But on a re-breathing system only a small amount of fresh cold oxygen is included in each breath.

When you add a heating device to warm the air then you make a real difference to their body temperature during an anaesthetic.  They recover faster and their anaesthetics are more stable, perfect for the little oldies.

Add to that a hot air blanket that we can cover them with if needed and you’re talking toasty warm cats & dogs.

Stress Free Cat Visits

Do you want your fur-baby to have the most stress free visit at the vet? We definitely do!

A common sign of a ‘flipped lid’. Claws are usually out!

A few weeks ago the team here at Summer Hill Village Vet were lucky enough to have Tracy from VetPrac deliver an enlightening training session on cat behaviour. Vets, nurses and receptionists learnt more about how to keep your fur babies as stress-free and relaxed as possible – from the moment they walk in, through to consultation and handling as well as housing for longer stays in our hospital. She taught us some great distraction techniques, so don’t worry if you see one of our vets pull out an ice-cream cone full of anchovy paste during consult!

There are also good anti-anxiety medications that we’ve been trialling for a while now that can really help cats (& dogs) start off on the right paw at their visits.

‘Burrito Cat’ – a wrapping ‘art’ we tend to use to comfortably restrain the crankier kitties

We also learnt that once a cat has ‘flipped it’s lid’ (lets be real, all cat owners know exactly what this means) there is no going back. Essentially the cat is in fight, flight or freeze mode and once this happens it can take up to 24 hours before they can fully relax again. We certainly don’t want this for any of our patients. This is why you may notice us doing more handling with towels or ‘kitty burritos’ (as some of our nurses like to call it) as well as trying minimal handling, or even taking the top off your carrier to ensure your cat stays as comfy and relaxed as possible.

During consults, our vets and nurses will often try to find out what kind of handling suits your cat best before going ahead with a physical exam. Do they like to be held close? Or would they rather just do their own thing and laze on the consult table?

As a result of this training, the team are now better equipped to make sure you AND your furry friend have an easier time as we aim to minimise the anxiety associated with trips to the vet. Our team gained a lot from this training session, and Tracy will be back soon to give us more helpful tips and tricks for dogs! So stay posted.

 

2019-08-17 14.38.47-1.jpg

 

About: Hyperthyroid Cats

Hyperthyroidism is the most common metabolic disorder in middle-aged cats (> 8 years old).

What is Hyperthyroidism and what causes it?

It is the over production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid glands. In most cases it is usually due to a benign overgrowth of the glands. However, malignant tumours have been reported to be the cause.

The exact cause of hyperthyroidism in cats is still unknown but multiple factors that could play a role have been identified, such as genetics, age, and increased utilisation of commercial cat food.

What symptoms should I look out for?

Hyperthyroid cats can present with many signs as thyroid hormone affects various body systems. The classic signs include weight loss, overeating, over drinking or increased thirst, increased vocalisation, agitation/aggression, increased activity, vomiting, diarrhoea and unkempt hair coat.

Figure: A cat before (left) and while (right) suffering from hyperthyroidism. Note the weight loss and unkempt hair coat.

How is it treated?

A range of treatment options are currently available including radioactive iodine therapy, anti-thyroid medication, surgical removal of thyroid glands and dietary therapy.

 

 

 

 

 

If you suspect that your cat may have hyperthyroidism based on the above information, please don’t hesitate to bring your little one to our clinic for a blood test. It is best to identify and treat hyperthyroidism early as it can lead to dysfunction of other body systems.

Leptospirosis: Should I be scared?!

As you may already be aware, there have been five recent cases reported of Leptospirosis in dogs around the inner-city area of Sydney. We understand that this would cause a lot of concern for all dog owners in the inner west as such we have put together this short summary to shed some light on the chances of your dog coming into contact with the bacteria as well as what symptoms to look out for if you suspect your dog may have it.

What is Leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is a disease caused by the bacteria Leptospira. Leptospirosis has many different strains (also known as serovars). Each serovar infects different animals including dogs, cattle, pigs and horses. Leptospirosis is very responsive to current antibiotics but organ failure can result in death.
Leptospirosis does NOT affect cats.

It is more common in Queensland where it is humid and warm and generally less of a risk in Sydney. It is spread through the urine of rats (disease hosts) and infected dogs, and the bacteria can live for months to years in soil and water.

Want more information? We’ve put together a printer friendly handout for you to keep handy!

Dogs and Noise Phobia – How to Deal with Your Dog’s Fear

Noise phobia is very common among dogs and many other animals. Dog owners suffer a great loss because of this when their pets damage their property in fear. This fear of noise is severe among dogs and can be seen or noticed easily by their activities. Some dogs engage in escape activities when they experience this kind of fear. Escape activities can be like jumping out of the window, digging under the round, chewing doors or any other furniture, climbing fences and many others. To treat your pet dog or even stray dogs for that matter, you need to take them to a good animal hospital like Summer Hill Village Vet.

Dogs possess sensitive hearing; even a low pitched noise can hurt their ears. They hear much louder than us, hence can get scared by noise easily. Noise phobia in dogs can arise by lightning, cracker noise, gunshots, loudspeakers etc. Some of the physical changes that you might notice in your dogs are crying, pace, tremble, or even widely opened eyes. So, if your pet is suffering from noise phobia, take it to a nearby animal hospital and take consultation from a good vet.

6 Tips to Deal with Your Dog’s Fear of Noise

Now that you know noise phobia in dogs is common and how your dog responds to it, you should know how to deal with this problem. So, here are the 8 important tips you need to follow to deal with your dog’s fear from noise:

  1. When your dog gets frightened and comes to you, never ignore it. Shower all your love and hug your pup in order to calm them down. This will ensure a feeling of safety.
  2. Visit your vet and speak to them about the problem. Summerhill Vet Clinic can really help you to better understand the phobia and provide you with guidance.
  3. Music can calm anyone; why not try it with animals? Play some good music in low volume so that your pet can ignore outdoor noises and stay calm and peaceful.
  4. Medication can also help in curing this problem. Proper drugs advised by a vet like Summerhill Vet can really help in minimizing the fear affects in dogs. The drugs may include antidepressants and tranquilizers to lessen their fear.
  5. Essential oils are effective for relaxing and de-stressing. Try putting a few drops of it on the dog’s collar to lessen their fear responses.
  6. If your dog fears from storm and thunders, never leave him outdoors in such a weather condition. He might injure himself or try to run away from outdoor enclosures when frightened by any noise caused by storms.

Noise phobia in dogs is something which can’t be ignored. It can become severe if not addressed. We recommend consulting a veterinary clinic like Summerhill Village Vet and get the medication for your pet very soon.