FAQs about the Coronavirus

Corona FAQs

Q: What is SHVV doing to make their hospital as safe as possible for me and my pet?

A: We are monitoring AVA, NSW Government & WHO guidelines & updating our practice protocols constantly. We are asking clients who are unwell to stay at home, keeping employees home if they are unwell, cleaning surfaces within the clinic & maintaining distance as much as possible. Please help us by following our requests to stand back from reception, use hand-sanitisers etc.

Q: What can I do to help keep SHVV a safe place?

A: We need to minimise contact time between people so please

  • Limit the number of people presenting your pet to just one owner if possible
  • When arriving for your appointment, please wait in your car
  • Please phone us from your car on arrival and we can return the phone call to welcome you into the clinic when we are ready to see your pet.
  • Please use hand sanitisers located in the clinic.
  • Please phone ahead to order required prescription medicine repeats or food, worming and flea control in advance so we can arrange to have them ready for you without the need to wait.

Q: My pet needs to be seen by a Vet but I’m in self-isolation (maybe I have tested positive to COVID-19). What can I do?

A: Call us! We will discuss options – rest assured we will find a way to care for your pet. Please do not break quarantine and put other people at risk.

Q: I need to come to the Vet hospital but I don’t want to (because I’m elderly or immunocompromised). What can I do?

A: Call us! We will discuss options – rest assured we will find a way to care for your pet. Options include dropping-off medications, house-calls or collecting your pet to be examined at the hospital.

Q: How does COVID-19 spread?

A: The World Health Organisation states: People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. This is why it is important to stay more than 1 meter (3 feet) away from a person who is sick.

Q: Can I catch Covid-19 from my pet?

A: The World Health Organisation states: While there has been one instance of a dog being infected in Hong Kong, to date, there is no evidence that a dog, cat or any pet can transmit COVID-19. COVID-19 is mainly spread through droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently and thoroughly.

Q: Can humans catch COVID-19 from animals?

A: The World Health Organisation states: Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in animals. Occasionally, people get infected with these viruses which may then spread to other people. For example, SARS-CoV was associated with civet cats and MERS-CoV is transmitted by dromedary camels. Possible animal sources of COVID-19 have not yet been confirmed.

To protect yourself, such as when visiting live animal markets, avoid direct contact with animals and surfaces in contact with animals. Ensure good food safety practices at all times. Handle raw meat, milk or animal organs with care to avoid contamination of uncooked foods and avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Useful links:

Santa Paws 2019!

Embarrassing Bodies- The Pet Edition, Free Health Checks!

Cats and dogs come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes what’s normal for one pet may be abnormal for another depending on things like breed, age, lifestyle and etc. For example- the skin and coat needs of a Sphynx cat to that of a Ragdoll’s will vary immensely!

Pets come in all different shapes, sizes and hair styles! As such their health needs are very individualistic.

Pets come in all different shapes, sizes and hair styles! As such their health needs are very individualistic.

In order to help you as a pet owner decide what is best for your cat or dog, the team at Summer Hill Village Vet have developed a complimentary 5-point Health Check that covers the basic individual care needs for your pet. These 5-point Health Checks are part of our Embarrassing Bodies- The Pet Edition and will run until the end of November 2018.

What do these 5-Point Health Checks include?

Embarrassing Bodies: Pet Edition Promo Poster

Book your cat or dog in for their FREE 5-Point Health Check before the end of November 2018.

Our 5-Point Health Checks aim to cover the following areas of your pet’s health with one of our trained vet nurses:

  1. Body Condition Scoring What may be healthy weight for a greyhound would be unhealthy for a german shepherd! Our trained nurses will score your cat or dog’s body condition (based on weight and appearance), then compare it to their breed and lifestyle recommendations. The nurses will work with you to develop a plan for how to get your pet into their healthy weight range (whether it’s through diet changes or new exercise routines).
  2. Dental Health One of our nurses will give your cat or dog a dental grading from 0 to 5 (0- being perfect teeth and 5 being the opposite…). They will also give you advice on how to manage your pet’s dental health from recommending treats such as Greenies Dental Treats or teaching you home care tips.
  3. Skin and Coat Needs Certain breeds may require a more intensive grooming routine than others. This depends on more than hair length. Skin allergies can come into play when deciding what products to bathe them in and how often they should be bathed.
  4. Vaccination Needs Your pet’s lifestyle determines what sort of vaccinations they need. Our nurses can help you decide if your cat or dog is getting the protection they need by discussing with you their routine (i.e. outdoor vs. indoor, do they visit beaches or bush a lot? do they come in contact with other animals?).
  5. Parasite Protection (fleas + ticks and intestinal worms)We can all agree that  fleas, ticks and worms are all nasty and best to be avoided all together! Similar to vaccination needs, the type of parasite prevention product you use on your cat and dog is largely based on lifestyle. However, other things to consider include whether your pet is easy to give oral medication to and also how good you are as an owner at remembering to give them their treatment on time (monthly options vs. 3 monthly options).

How do I book my cat or dog in for this?

Simply call our clinic (02 9797 2555) before the end of November 2018 and let us know that you would like to book your pet in for a Free-5-Point-Health-Chek 🙂

Open Day – Celebrating 10 Years of Service

Sunday, 17th June 2018 – Save the date!

We’re happy to announce it has been a decade since Dr. Lydia and Dr. Sandra first opened the clinic back in 2008. Summer Hill Village Vet is having an Open Day Event to celebrate, full of fun and festivities!  The team have enjoyed looking after your pets over the last 10 years, and we would love for you to join us on Sunday, 17th June.

What’s on?

We have a big day planned, including clinic tours and refreshments. There’s face paintings, show bags (for children and pets!), and a raffle drawing!

Want to join the raffle? Come in for a purchase, or an appointment with your pet from now until the 17th of June. Grab an entry slip from one of our friendly receptionists, fill in your details, and drop it in our entry box (there’s a balloon attached to the box so you can’t miss it!).

Where are we?

Find us at 29 Grosvenor Crescent, Summer Hill, we are located just across the road from the Summer Hill train station.

There’ll be something for everyone so please save the 17th of June and come join us for an afternoon of fun. Give us a ring at 02 9797 2555 if you have any enquiries or jump onto our Facebook page to find out more. Looking forward to seeing you all!

 

Special Needs Boarding

EXPERT BOARDING CARE FOR CATS

Summer Hill Village Vet knows that taking a holiday is difficult when you have a pet with special needs. Be it a senior cat that doesn’t adjust to change and boarding well, or a family feline with a medical issue (or two!), even taking a long weekend away can seem like more stress than relaxation. To help you feel assured your cat’s safe and snug, we have changed our boarding policies to make monitoring and assessing your little one’s needs even more thorough.

Mork getting some TLC while his family is on holiday.

HOW WILL MONITORING BE DIFFERENT?

The staff at Summer Hill Village Vet have always taken care with all their cat boarders. This month we’ve been refreshing our boarding room and saw the opportunity to provide even more features and benefits to our lodgers with special needs. Almost all Special Needs Boarders will have an assessment by a vet upon admission. A detailed plan is written up that the vet and you agree on to best care for your boarding pet. We’ll also discuss upon admission when and how to send boarder updates while you’re on holiday, including options like SMS photos and health check updates.

LEVELS OF CARE:

SMS picture updates of your cat are always available.

All our cattery guests get love and attention, but age and medical conditions mean some boarders need extra care. Even healthy older cats may get nervous the first day or two in boarding, which could cause them to not eat or toilet properly. If your cat is new to our clinic and over 8 years old and/or has a medical condition, we will book a vet admission consult the same day you’ll be bringing your cat in for boarding. All patients and boarders (even our lovely regulars) over 12 years old will get a vet admission consult for every boarding visit. These special admissions allow us to personalise their needs, and can include (among other possible needs) such medical requirements as:

  • Fluid support
  • Injections
  • Daily vitals
  • Blood glucose check
  • Urine Test
  • Blood pressure monitor

Are you thinking of your own grand adventure? Do you have questions about how we can attend to your cat’s special needs? We’d love to hear from you! Contact us at (02) 9797 2555.

Pet Adoption Guide: where to start

Committing to the adoption of a pet is a huge responsibility. As vets, we know how exciting it is to get a new cat or dog, but there are a few questions to ask yourself before bringing home a new furry friend.

Picking the right family member:

Think about how your pet will fit into your life and schedule. Will it be sharing its new home with children or other pets? Do you have a large enough space and active lifestyle for an energetic pet? Will you enjoy tending to grooming needs and devoting time to training?

It’s hard not to get swayed by an adorable puppy face that needs adoption, but think about your lifestyle honestly before taking on such a big commitment; perhaps an older dog, kitten or cat, or rabbit, may be a better fit to welcome into the family.

 

Where to adopt:

The Sydney area is full of adoption options, and it’s sometimes hard to know where to start. Online reviews, word of mouth, and vet recommendations are a good place to start. Ask questions about the animal’s personality, and check that trials are allowed if you have another pet at home to introduce the new one to.

A few of the rescue groups we recommend at Summer Hill Village Vet are:

Cost considerations:

The purchase price or adoption fee of a new pet is only the tip of the iceberg. The following items need to be included in your budget:

  • Food every day
  • Regular health checks (once or twice a year for most pets)
  • Dental care (dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, horses)
  • Vaccinations
  • Desexing in the first year
  • Parasite control year round
  • Grooming
  • Bedding, toys, litter, clothes, and accessories
  • Boarding or pet minding fees when you go away
  • Vet bills for accident and illness for their lifetime
  • Pet health insurance (which can reduce vet bills)

Try fostering:

Animals that enter fostering programs not only ease the limited space of most rescue organisations, but it gives you the opportunity to help an animal- even for as little as a week- while trialling if the animal is a good fit for your lifestyle.  If you decide the animal is the perfect addition to your family, you can then make the full commitment of adoption.

Lumps and Bumps: How to Check Your Pet at Home

Did you know that nearly 50% of dogs present with lumps and bumps at their annual health check? Some of the lumps are not of concern, whilst others are an indication of more serious problems. It is so important that lumps are checked early and often, so we want to give you some tips on how to check your pet at home.

Take 5-10 minutes each month to check for lumps, bumps, and swellings.

Pick the same date for each month, mark it on your calendar, and turn your check into a monthly routine. It’s simple and quick, and could be the difference in early detection, treatment, and prognosis.

Check your pet from top to tail.

Your pet will often feel like they are getting a massage from you, and are often happy to let you check. Don’t forget ears, nose, and even inside the mouth. Not sure where to start? Check out Dr Lydia’s short video to help you know where to look.

Follow up with an exam.

Book an appointment with you vet if you noticed anything suspicious. Snip a piece of hair or mark the spot with a marker if you think it will be hard to find again later.

Keep a record of growths.

Use a worksheet of your pet’s silhouette to circle with a black ink pen any suspicious lumps and bumps you’ve found. Now use this same chart the next month to circle with blue pen. Continue monthly to help you keep track of any new or increased growths, and bring the chart to your pet’s next vet visit. Print our Bumps Handout to help you keep track.